CPD Opportunities for our members.

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CPD Opportunities for our members.

Post  Jill Newlands on Mon Jun 07, 2010 3:40 pm

I am NATED's CPD Officer and I'd like to know what you, our members want. I have ideas for workshops and a CSW Summer School in mind but I want to know what you would like. We aim to provide something for our entire membership and that includes Deaf Trainers and Teachers of the Deaf too. Please let me know what your suggestions are, what you'd like to see advertised and we can then look at how to meet your needs and requests. Please email me or post your suggestions on here.

Kind regards

Jill Newlands
NATED CPD Officer
jill.newlands@googlemail.com

Jill Newlands

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the difference between an interpreter and CSW

Post  sarahvann on Mon Jul 05, 2010 7:35 am

I have been asked what the difference is between an interpreter and a CSW and how you can identify which profession is relevant to the need of the individual - could this warrant any training? Could anyone offer any response to the question, as I happily answered to the best of my ability, but would be intrigued with others views please! (yes after 10months off on maternity I am slowing plodding back into the real world and work oh dear) Sarah

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CSWs and Interpreters

Post  Jill Newlands on Sun Jul 11, 2010 9:53 am

Hi Sarah,

I think there are various differences and some similarities between the two professions.

CSWs don't just interpret between English and BSL, they take notes, lipspeak, create glossaries, provide tutorials, do language modification, work with deafblind learners etc within the realms of education and increasingly, employment. CSWs can work as such after gaining just level 2 in BSL and ideally having the CSW qualification, GCSE maths and English. Many CSWs have had no training and enter employment with just level 2 BSL. It varies from place to place with regard to entry requirements and attitudes to staff development.

Interpreters are trained how to interpret, taught about professional boundaries, reflective practice, translation processes, interpreting processes and models of interpreting etc. Interpreters are usually educated to postgraduate level or will have gained NVQ4 in Interpreting or an older equivalent. They will have a high level of English as well as BSL. They may, as part of their work, undertake translation of written texts, create BSL resources and do language modification, provide Deaf awareness training and will liaise with other professionals. Interpreters should be insured and registered with a professional body to protect themselves and consumers and also do continuous professional development. Interpreters also have the right to refuse work deemed unsuitable for them, i.e I don't do legal work because I haven't trained in that domain and I don't feel that I am experienced enough to train in that arena yet. CSWs are unfortunately often given assignments above and beyond their skill set and capabilities but don't always feel they can say no.

CSWs are unfortunately also often paid low fees compared to their skills and there often isn't much recognition for their own professional development i.e. achieving BSL level 4 doesn't always attract a pay rise. Interpreters are usually paid in line with their skills and abilities but do have to pay high fees for training and development and professional registration. Interpreters tend to work in domains such as employment, higher education, some primary and secondary education, legal, mental health, health, conferences, theatre, events etc. CSWs tend to work in schools, colleges and some work domains. To be called an 'interpreter' means that people know you've achieved a particular standard of training that can be trusted in line with national requirements. CSWs can range from level 2 BSL users with no other qualifications up to very highly qualified CSWs with level 4 BSL skills and interpreting, note-taking, lipspeaking, language modification training.

There are many more issues we could delve into when looking at the differences and this is a very crude distinction but I hope it's a helpful one.

Jill Newlands

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